U of T named one of Canada’s top employers for 11th year

The University of Toronto has once again been recognized as one of Canada’s Top 100 Employers. This is 11th time that U of T has made the list.

In its 19th year, the national awards program highlights employers that offer “exceptional workplaces for their employees”. Winners were announced earlier today in Canada’s Top 100 online magazine, published by the Globe and Mail.

Attendees at the University of Toronto Scarborough’s 2016 Faculty & Staff Seasonal Reception

Attendees at the University of Toronto Scarborough’s 2016 Faculty & Staff Seasonal Reception with Bruce Kidd, Vice-President & Principal UTSC (left)

“The best employers recognize that they need to innovate thoughtfully to keep moving forward,” says Richard Yerema, Managing Editor of Canada’s Top 100 Employers project. “But the challenge is to evolve with changes in technology and employee expectations while maintaining the goal of creating better workplaces that align the needs of their business with those of their employees.”

Among the reasons cited for U of T’s award include financial benefits, compensation and health and family-friendly benefits such as the Family Care Office and its offerings for faculty and staff.

For more information on the reasons for selection, visit U of T’s Canada’s Top 100 Employer page.

University of Toronto Library staff pose for a photo in front of an airplane during a charity plane pull event

Methodology

All employers are compared to other organizations in their field and region to determine which offers the most progressive and forward-thinking programs in these eight criteria:

  1. Physical workplace
  2. Work atmosphere and social
  3. Health, financial and family benefits
  4. Vacation and time off
  5. Employee communications
  6. Performance management
  7. Training and skills development
  8. Community involvement

To learn more about Canada’s Top 100 Employers Award, please visit Canada’s Top 100 Employers.

A woman dances in a brightly-coloured traditional indigenous costume

Photo Credits: University of Toronto Libraries